How Do Therapy and Coaching Differ?

How Do Therapy and Coaching Differ?

How do you know if you need a therapist or a coach? This is a question I get a lot. Particularly since I am both licensed as a therapist and certified as a coach. Both are useful. Both have a purpose and both may be useful in your life at one time or another. For the most part therapy and coaching are different, however there is a middle ground where they overlap. So how do therapy and coaching differ? How do I choose which is right for me?

Therapy Focuses on Mental Health Issues

If someone is feeling depressed or anxious or is an incest survivor or has addictions or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), therapy is the place to start.

Therapy covers mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. The mental health maybe minor and caused by life circumstance or a major disorder that causes great long-term distress and even problems functioning such as bipolar, borderline or obsessive compulsive disorders. Trauma can be the result of rape, incest or war. Therapists, both support and empower their client to overcome these issues and lead a normal life – whatever normal is anyway – or may be necessary long term to deal with ongoing issues. The main purpose of therapy is to increase the level of functioning to a normal state.

Only Therapy is Covered by Mental Health Insurance

If mental health insurance is used, there must be a mental health diagnosis in order to use insurance. A mental health diagnosis is anything from mild depression or an adjustment disorder to a more serious diagnosis such as debilitating depression, anxiety or schizophrenia or bipolar or post dramatic stress disorder. The mental health diagnosis if turned into an insurance company will stay forever on your permanent health record, just as there will always be a permeant record that you had cancer or broke an ankle.

Sometimes Therapy and Coaching Look a Lot Alike

Sometimes therapy and coaching look a lot alike. Some therapists use short-term solution focused therapy to help clients deal with specific issues around life transitions. These are often not insurance billable because the client does not meet the criteria for any type of mental health disorder according to the DSM-V or the new ICD-10 Codes. In the middle ground the distinction between coaching and therapy dims, whether or not it looks more like therapy or more like coaching is based more on the practitioners approach.

Coaching Focuses on Goals

Coaching has a different primary goal. It is to support and empower clients to go from good or even just okay to great. I want to empower my coaching clients to thrive in ALL areas of their lives. Coaching is present and future focused and devoted to closing the gap from where one is now to where one would most want to be. Coaching clients are willing to accept responsibility for their own actions. Life Coaching focuses on empowering and supporting clients in achieving their goals in all aspects of their life.

Coaches are not advice givers. Powerful coaches ask powerful questions to empower clients to determine their own answers and actions that are best for them.

Coaching requires that the client take action! This is why I have started including a Next Action Step in all of my blog posts!

What About Relationship Coaching?

People with relationship issues may seek either a relationship coach or a relationship therapist. Again to use mental health insurance, one or both of the clients must have a mental health diagnosis. I call myself a relationship coach because I deal with clients who are interested in improving their relationships and improving the quality of their communication as well as clients who are just trying to decide whether they should stay or go in their relationships.

What About Other Types of Coaching?

Coaches often combine powerful questions, which is the hallmark of coaching, with subject matter expertise and or a particular style or coaching approach.

For instance you may talk to a life coach, a business coach, a relationship coach, an organizational coach, a career coach or a coach with other specific specialties.

Coaches can also work with clients who may have been in therapy to help them move forward with their lives.

Coaching is Based on a Different Agreement Between the Coach and the Client

As a coach, I see my clients as whole and okay just as they are. I do not see them as someone with a problem who “needs to fixed.” Okay, you may not like where you are and want something different but coaching clients are motivated toward a positive goal. As a coaching client you are ready and willing to do what it takes to move towards your goal. You have the resources you need inside you. A goal can be very concrete such as start a business or find a job or it can be to gain clarity on one or more issues or to increase personal growth, happiness or the quality or a relationship.

My Coaching Expertise

My focus is on personal growth, transformation and relationships. This focus empowers my clients to have increased happiness, clarity and a sense of meaning and purpose plus increased confidence as their goals are met. My clients are generally successful in one or more areas of their lives. They have generally read a number of self help books and want to improve the quality of both their lives and relationships.

I work with clients dealing with relationship issues such as communication, affairs, dating, divorce and should I go or should I stay; I have taught divorce recovery classes for over six years. Couples also come who just want to improve the quality of their relationships. I have experience and training both as a relationship coach and a therapist with over 20 years experience working with individuals, couples and groups.

My expertise as a coach comes in many areas that I have both personal training and experience in. I’m an entrepreneur and have been involved in family businesses. I’m very creative. I have an MBA and also work with entrepreneurs and small businesses.

My Coaching Style

My style of coaching comes from a variety of sources. My business background, my training as a therapist, my spiritual background and being a stay at home mom all contribute to how I coach. I have a degree from seminary, am a certified Gestalt Practitioner and also have certifications and training in life and relationship, leadership and entrepreneurial coaching from the Hendricks Institute. I use a variety of techniques including cutting edge, whole body, whole mind techniques which fall into what is referred to as somatic or body centered coaching.

How Do You Find a Coach That is Right For You?

In seeking coach I recommend having a trial consultation of 20 or 30 minutes to determine if you and the coach are a good fit for each other. With so many different styles of coaching and so many ways of working with people, the most important ingredient in working with a coach is that you both feel comfortable with each other.

Next Action Step

If you would like to know more about how I work as a coach or might be interested in me please click here for a free 30 minute consultation to see if we might be a good fit for each other. I’d love to talk with you!

Amy BarnesAmelia Barnes of Inner Outcomes works primarily with successful women in midlife who may have a variety of life and relationship issues. They know life could be better. They don’t want to upset others yet they want to follow their dreams and passions. Often they would describe themselves as perfectionists, procrastinators or people pleasers.

Amelia is a licensed Mental Health Counselor, certified Gestalt Therapist, Certified Conscious Living and Loving Coach, and Leadership and Transformation Coach.

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Build Your Profitable Business – Starting Now

Build your profitable business
Do you ever feel like it’s an uphill battle to build your business so that it’s profitable?

Well, you’re not alone! Most entrepreneurs begin their business because of their passion. Who knew there was so much to learn about how to make that passion profitable, right? I know that business owners everywhere face this dilemma, especially solo-entrepreneurs and those who are service-based (coaches, consultants, healers, etc.)

So just where do you start if you’re ready to stop struggling and begin creating the profitable business you dream of? Well, I’ve got some ideas for you. (Imagine that!) I’d like to outline a step-by-step process you can follow to create the business success you desire.

5 Steps to Build Your Profitable Business

Step 1: Clarify Your Vision

Why is this so important to creating a profitable business? Well, it may not seem obvious at first, but if you don’t know what your vision is for your business you’ll find yourself floundering when it comes to creating success.

By clarifying your vision you create alignment between your personal values, your ideal life, and your business goals. When you do that, you’ll be running a successful business and creating your dream life. You know, the dream life you got into business for in the first place. To help you with this step, treat yourself to my complimentary workbook, Create a Brilliant Vision for Your Life and Business.

Step 2: Claim Your Tribe

Before you can successfully create offers of any kind for your tribe (your niche, your people, your target market) you absolutely need to know who they are, what their problems are and what they want from you. Let’s face it, you can’t create a successful offer if you don’t know who you’re trying to help and what kind of help they want.

At this point it may be time for you to dig deep – deeper than you’ve already gone – to clearly identify how you can best serve your tribe. The result of doing this is that you’ll be able to tailor your brilliance specifically to meet your tribe’s needs – serving them in powerful and relevant ways.

Step 3: Focus Your Expertise

This is where you identify exactly what you’re passionate about sharing with your tribe. You absolutely need to identify and focus your expertise in order to move forward in your business with confidence. Instead of thinking “well, I should just do this because it worked for so-and-so” you identify and focus in on your own gifts, talents, strengths, and passions. Then both you and your clients will be able to see you as the expert you already are.

When you complete these first three steps you’ll be standing on a solid business foundation. And now building your successful, profitable business becomes a whole lot easier.

Step 4: Design Your Programs

With your strong foundation in place you can begin building desirable programs and offers that meet your potential clients’ needs.

Why is this step so crucial to creating a thriving, profitable business? Because you’ve got to know how to share your brilliance in a way that your clients are interested in – in a way that meets their needs and that they’re willing to invest in. How can they understand the deep value that you provide if they aren’t already familiar with what you do and its benefits? They need a frame of reference. They need context. And that’s what your signature programs do for you – help your clients see what you do and understand what’s in it for them.

When you do that well, the programs you create become your signature. You become known for programs that get results clients care about. You will be able to successfully transform the core of your powerful work into a framework that your potential clients understand, are attracted to, and are ready to sign up for. Your signature programs also help your clients more easily achieve the results they desire because you will have outlined a clear path for them to follow.

Step 5: Market Your Magic

By transforming your natural brilliance into desirable programs, you’ve created a little bit of magic. Magic that is uniquely you and that emphasizes what you offer your clients.

It’s time to identify your best marketing options as well as the systems and technical aspects that need to be in place for a smooth launch of your program. As a result you’ll have a personalized marketing strategy for your program that you can have confidence in and actually follow through on. You’ll be in alignment with your values, your program, your clients, and your business goals.

That’s it. Those are the five core steps for building your profitable business.

Just imagine what becomes possible for you in your business once you’ve walked through all five of these steps, taking time to align with your business vision, speaking clearly to your tribe and their needs, focusing your expertise every step of the way, and organizing your brilliance into programs and offers that meet your clients’ needs. This yields amazing results!

Taking action to implement these five powerful steps will (1) result in the successful transformation of your brilliance into your own, unique signature programs that will (2) greatly enhance the one-on-one client work you’re already doing and (3) take you beyond individual client work so that you can leverage your time and energy.

And then what? Then you are indeed building your profitable (and sustainable!) business. And that means you are creating your dream life.

I know that you’re passionate about what you do and that you want to help even more people with your gifts and expertise.

So begin today.

Create the successful, flourishing business you dream of by applying these powerful steps. And don’t do it alone. You don’t have to!

Give yourself and your business future the support needed to grow and flourish with ease. If you’d like to talk with me about how I can support you as a business coach and as your guide, let’s do it. Together we can explore the options available so you can create the successful, flourishing business you dream of – today, not someday.

Margie BieswangerMargie Beiswanger of Transform Your Brilliance delights in showing experienced coaches and other transformative entrepreneurs how to translate their unique gifts and expertise into signature programs so that they can reach more of their ideal clients, leverage their time, expand their business, and earn a good living. As a successful business coach and mentor, she is passionate about showing solopreneurs how their brilliance can shine even brighter!

Margie is a certified Martha Beck Life Coach and worked with Indiana University for 26 years in research, teaching, and administration, and is still a sought-after training consultant for other universities.
She brings together her vast academic experience and her coaching skills to lead training and development workshops around the country, in addition to mentoring her clients individually and in groups.

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We Experience What We Attract

We Experience What We Attract
You are over stretched, you’re working your tail off, you’re trying to get things accomplished and lead a team of volunteers to achieve your vision of success. Yet you find that some of your team members are combative and your best performers are dropping off to join another committee. What’s going on? Why doesn’t anyone appreciate what you are doing and all the time that you are contributing to this effort?

You can either look at this as a situation as— it is everyone else’s fault, i.e. they don’t get it, they want to make me look bad, they are not team players; OR, you can look inward at why you are hearing this message. What message are you sending that is being returned to you in this way? How are you sending a message that makes people combative, or that you really don’t want a team?

“You govern your surroundings by the nature of what is taking place in your consciousness.” ~ Joel S. Goldsmith

Recently, I was informed by two different sources from completely different situations, that they had been blindsided by something that I had done. I was totally taken aback. Of course this would never be my intention, but hearing it from two people indicated to me that I needed to take a step back and see how I had attracted this to myself. What thoughts was I dealing with internally that didn’t take into consideration the efforts of others? How is blindsiding showing up in my life? These are tough questions to face, I know.

In this case, I think it comes down to the desire to have full control so that we would have the desired outcome. I was not trusting enough of others. I was not trusting that the right thing would happen, that the outcome is bigger than me, that it’s OK to let others take on the tasks and even fail possibly. Sometimes that is what needs to happen and I need to trust that. By trusting others and trusting the process, the doors to possibilities and success blow wide open and feel so freeing to me. I don’t have to do it all. I admit that I had been feeling as if I had to do it all and that people were letting me down. I was attracting that.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“The world is full of people who will hurt and disappoint you. Unfortunately, those are the only kind of people that there are.” ~ Unknown

We have a role in everything that happens to us. And we have full control in how we react to it. Sometimes we need help in changing our behavior. I’m committed to trusting more, delegating more and letting things happen. And if you see me trying to be too controlling—call me on it, please!

Lynn ZettlerLynn Zettler founded CORE IMPACT COACHING, Inc. (formerly LifeAction Coaching), an Executive and Professional Coaching firm serving business owners, and C-suite and corporate professionals, in 2006. Leveraging from her 20-year corporate and leadership experience from The Dow Chemical Company, and Coach University training, Lynn partners with clients to develop their leadership and communication styles, while aligning with their integrity and vision. With a specialty in effective communications, Lynn engages organizations through workshops and trainings related to topics such as: Leading With Influence, Core Values at Work, The One Page Business PlanTM, and many others.

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What is Your Question Behind the Question? Who are You Choosing to Become?

There is an old adage that has stuck with me for 40+ years. “We are the sum total of our choices.” Said another way, “We are who we choose to become.” At various times in my life that ‘truth’ has been uncomfortable.

My observation is that many of us have forgotten about the power of choice in our lives. What we are ‘choosing’ to do, and what we are ‘choosing not to do.’ The ‘busy-ness’ of our lives, the noise in our heads, seem to ‘short circuit’ our willingness or ability to be more ‘intentional’ (on purpose) about what we choose. Consequently, we ‘give away’ some of the important power to ‘live’ our lives and become some lesser version of who we could be.

Think about your own life. Do you find yourself saying that you have no time for this or that, your work or boss is so demanding, when you’re done with work you have all these responsibilities that life seems so overwhelming at times? Does it seem like other people’s choices are ‘crowding’ your own? Is this how you have come to see your life? Is that okay, or is there another way you want to think about it, and another way that you would prefer to live?

When my life begins to resemble the above, I find it beneficial to ask the ‘question behind the question’ (QBTQ). It is a time to examine not only what I’m choosing, but why. What value, belief, or deeply held assumption is at work in this particular area of my life? Exploring the QBTQ is often quite difficult, but it is the key to change. One word of warning – in the process of exploring the ‘QBTQ’ you may uncover information, knowledge, or develop an awareness that may be an ‘epiphany’ as it relates to the actions or thinking you want to change. The common thought is that once I have all the awareness and ‘data’ I need that the path to change will be linear and successful. It isn’t. Countless times I witness people that have all the information, knowledge, and awareness they need continue to make choices that are not in their best interest – baffling, frustrating, sometimes humorous. Why is that? I don’t know. My mentor, Dr. William Glasser, believed that we choose the behavior we do because it gives us the most control, regardless of whether or not it is ‘good’ for us. Maybe he’s right. It comes closer to explaining my own paradox between what I choose and what I ‘should’ choose.

We need to move on. Our awareness is still the cornerstone of change. Our motivation for all change comes when there is a perceived gap between where we are, and where we want to be. We need awareness to help us understand what it is we are choosing in order to choose to change… if we choose (intentionally confusing).

I have a friend who wanted to lose weight. After many failed attempts to lose weight and keep it off, I asked him if he knew what his ‘relationship’ was with food and the role food played in how he coped (QBTQ). He admitted he didn’t. In that moment, however, a light bulb went off. He understood that he was trying to solve for the symptom, but not the cause. In his case, once he started to work on the cause it was a much different and more difficult journey. He came to understand how and why he ‘abused’ food. He began to develop healthier coping skills. It was hard. He realized how a lifetime of attitudes and habits had to be formed, and how long it would take him to unlearn and relearn new ones. He chose the journey. After five years, he was able to lose weight and keep it off.

This is real life. The question behind the question can reveal deeply held beliefs, values, and assumptions about ourselves that have become habits that aren’t helping us. The journey to a different life is often difficult. It can also be transformational, your choice.

Is there a key QBTQ in your life – something that if you could change your thinking and/or your behavior about would make an incredible difference in the life you are choosing?

To a better you…

Jim
James Struck, President
B.A., M.A., Reality Therapy Certified
Leadership Vision, LLC
www.ldrshipvision.com

Jim StruckJim has been owner/president of Leadership Vision, LLC in Carmel, Indiana since 2006. His firm is dedicated to improving leadership effectiveness of individuals and teams so they experience greater performance in their business lives, and greater satisfaction in their personal lives.

Prior to Leadership Vision, Jim spent 25 years in the collection industry; including 21 years as CEO of Mutual Hospital Services, Inc., a hospital-owned healthcare receivables management company in Indianapolis.

Jim has served as:

* Chairman of ACA’s Healthcare Services Program
* President of the Indiana Pressler Memorial Chapter of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA)
* Executive Director of the National Healthcare Collectors Association (NHCA)

He writes and speaks extensively on leadership, employee engagement, personal productivity and energy management, and execution.

He obtained his B.A. degree from Hanover College and his Masters from Ball State University.

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How to Raise Your Personal Standards

Personal Standards
Last March was a big travel month for me with two trips and the collection of many frequent flier miles. For some reason the quality of toilet paper caught my attention in the cozy Florida airport (nice soft and multi-ply) and the expansive Atlanta terminal (thin single ply). I could theorize that the smaller airport can afford a higher quality TP because it serves fewer people, or that it serves an older clientele that prefers the extra softness, but it really all comes down to the standards set by the TP purchaser, right? What’s more important, the price or the quality?

I get it. It’s just TP, but I think it says so much more. The personal standards we set for ourselves become almost invisible to us, much like our TP. They become part of the background and our life reflects those standards. If you are experiencing a lot of difficulty in your life and work, it may indicate that a raising of standards is needed.

“If you don’t set baseline standards for what you’ll accept in your life, you’ll find it easy to slip into behaviors and attitudes and a quality of life that’s far below what you deserve.” ~ Tony Robbins

So how do you raise your personal standards you ask? Working with a coach will accelerate this process of course, but you can start with a few steps:

1. Make a list of 10 people that you admire, especially in how they deal with problems and people. How can you be more like them, yet still be yourself? Identify these role models and observe their behavior. Set some goals to emulate the behaviors that will meet a new higher standard for yourself.

2. Be constructive with absolutely everything you say. Yes, I said absolutely everything! This means that when you are faced with an issue, instead of blaming someone you only discuss ways to improve and move forward. When you find yourself in the middle of a gossip fest, you either change the direction to a constructive tone, or extract yourself from the conversation. This isn’t easy, but raising your standards shouldn’t be easy anyway.

3. Admit your role in everything that occurs in your space and raise your standards to prevent it from reoccurring. This can be difficult to do, but taking responsible for absolutely everything that happens to you. Determine what role you played in the situation. What could you have done differently in order to have a more successful outcome and what do you need to put in place in order to ensure that you’ll create more success in the future?

And above all, I wish you many years of soft, multi-ply TP.

Lynn ZettlerLynn Zettler founded CORE IMPACT COACHING, Inc. (formerly LifeAction Coaching), an Executive and Professional Coaching firm serving business owners, and C-suite and corporate professionals, in 2006. Leveraging from her 20-year corporate and leadership experience from The Dow Chemical Company, and Coach University training, Lynn partners with clients to develop their leadership and communication styles, while aligning with their integrity and vision. With a specialty in effective communications, Lynn engages organizations through workshops and trainings related to topics such as: Leading With Influence, Core Values at Work, The One Page Business PlanTM, and many others.

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Listening, Humility, and Connecting: How are They Present in Your Leadership?

I’ve got to admit, in my 20’s, and 30’s I probably did more talking than listening at work. Connected to that was a healthy sense of ego; maybe not arrogance, but definitely ego – trying to demonstrate what I knew or what I could solve. My listening on the job was often more about hearing and understanding than connecting. It is interesting to me now how often I see connected ‘talking’ and ‘ego,’ as well as ‘listening’ and ‘humility.’ Hmm, I wonder what that means?

I don’t know exactly when or how my evolution began, but it was tied to a desire to become a more effective leader. Part of the evolution came from greater security as a person and a leader. I had success which gave me the ‘permission’ to explore, to expand my thinking and what I did differently. Part of that exploration was with my father, the engineer.

My father is very different from me – more introverted (contemplative and quiet). After my mother passed, I had the chance to get to know my father on a much deeper level. I learned to be ‘present’ with my father without speaking, simply enjoying his company. When we did talk there was more of a give and take to our conversations that hadn’t been as present. I was able to find out more of what he was thinking, and feeling. For a guy who liked to talk this was a major shift for me!

At work I began to seek out people who weren’t like me. They tended to be more introverted, or have different values. I asked more questions. I not only listened for their answers, but looked for the common ground where we could connect. This activity opened a new appreciation for the diversity of others, not only in terms of personality, but also values. I came to appreciate their gifts and what they had to contribute. These interactions led to better discussions and decisions as an organization.

Perhaps the greatest part of my evolution was no longer feeling compelled to offer my opinions first, no longer needing to always ‘prove myself’, no longer be the guy with all the answers. With a little more humility came more peace, and more willingness to engage with others in deeper and more meaningful ways; a greater willingness to listen and reflect. I am still evolving.

Listening in order to connect is one of the greatest gifts we give to one another. It demonstrates our respect for them, and how much we care. Often, in the ‘connecting’ the other person will feel greater support and more valued, the cornerstone of engagement. Genuine listening creates the space in which to learn; to reduce our conflict and improve our ability and willingness to compromise. What do you observe about your ability to listen to connect? What do you see around you? Is there a change that would be beneficial for you?

Here are some thoughts for listening to connect.

1. Be more interested in what others are saying than what you are saying. To borrow from Covey, “Seek first to understand, then to be understood.” It is the chief way that we send the message that your ideas and you matter to me.

2. Empathize as a routine part of how you listen. Compassion and empathy send a powerful message about how you care.

3. Help people to feel valuable. People who feel valued are more secure which leads to greater capability.

4. Help others to listen better by helping them to take time to ‘breathe’ – emotionally and mentally. In a world that is full of ‘busyness’ breathing is the pause that allows us/others to ‘reset’ and to ‘refocus.’ In that moment is a time for them to listen to connect.

I would invite you to take time to reflect, to listen, to connect on a deeper level with those you work with, those you love, and, if you are so inclined, with your God.

To a better you…

Jim
James Struck, President
B.A., M.A., Reality Therapy Certified
Leadership Vision, LLC
www.ldrshipvision.com

Jim StruckJim has been owner/president of Leadership Vision, LLC in Carmel, Indiana since 2006. His firm is dedicated to improving leadership effectiveness of individuals and teams so they experience greater performance in their business lives, and greater satisfaction in their personal lives.

Prior to Leadership Vision, Jim spent 25 years in the collection industry; including 21 years as CEO of Mutual Hospital Services, Inc., a hospital-owned healthcare receivables management company in Indianapolis.

Jim has served as:

* Chairman of ACA’s Healthcare Services Program
* President of the Indiana Pressler Memorial Chapter of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA)
* Executive Director of the National Healthcare Collectors Association (NHCA)

He writes and speaks extensively on leadership, employee engagement, personal productivity and energy management, and execution.

He obtained his B.A. degree from Hanover College and his Masters from Ball State University.

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